Introduction to Literature

Reading in the Digital Age

Tag: Innocence and Experience

Treating Innocence and Experience

Respond to one of the following prompts with an initial post of at least 150 words:

Option A: Which poems in this section of LHE depend largely on irony for their force? Why do you think irony is a useful device in literature that portrays innocence and experience? Be sure to use specific details from the texts you choose in your response.

Option B: Some authors treat the passage from innocence to experience as comedy, while others treat it more seriously. Which text(s) from your reading for this week treat it as comedy and which treat it as something else? Elaborate on how each of your choices does so (in at least 50 words per text). Once you’ve done that answer this question in at least 50 words: Do you find one or the other treatment more satisfying? Explain.

Post your initial response to the Treating Innocence & Experience page on G+ Once you’ve made your initial post, comment on and/or ask questions about the experience described by at least three of your peers. Your responses should be at least 50 words long.

Defining Innocence and Experience

In LHE, Abcarian and Klotz observe that “that terms innocence and experience range widely in meaning, and that [this] range is reflected” in the texts they chose for inclusion in the Innocence and Experience section of their book. They further suggest that innocence can be biological, social, emotional, or mental (78). Pick at least one text from your reading for the week and discuss how the text(s) portray innocence in an initial response of at least 150 words. Consider:

  1. Is it biological, social, emotional, mental? Something else?
  2. What forces (if any) act upon the narrative’s character(s)/speaker(s) and influence them to become more or less innocent?
  3. What type of experience does the character/speaker gain (if any) in the narrative?
  4. And so on…

Post your initial response to the Defining Innocence & Experience page on G+ Once you’ve made your initial post, comment on and/or ask questions about the experience described by at least three of your peers. Your responses should be at least 50 words long.

The Work for Weeks 11 &12

Unit Theme: Innocence and Experience

Weeks 11-12 Focus: Fiction, Nonfiction, and Poetry

PrepareParticipateReflect


Prepare

ReadingOther

(Terms to Know: point of view and allusion)

This Week’s Reading

RequiredSupplemental

  • Required:
  • Thus far in the semester, I’ve allowed you to choose a portion of the unit reading, but for this section of the course, I’m allowing you to create your own reading list, per the following guidelines:

    • (Fiction): Pick three (3) stories from the fiction section in “Innocence and Experience” (LHE 80-128). This could include Hua’s “Appendix” (LHE 299-304) and Xue’s “Hut on the Mountain” (LHE 304-7).
    • (Nonfiction): Pick two (2) essays from the essays section in “Innocence and Experience” (LHE 280-97).
    • (Poetry): Pick eight (8) poems from the poetry section in “Innocence and Experience” (LHE 129-59). This could include Lim’s “Father from Asia” (LHE 308).
  • Supplemental
    • Review the items added to the class’s supplemental texts spreadsheet.


Other Preparation Activities

  • Record two entries in your Reading Notebook.
  • Search the internet for an online resource that supplements one of the texts from this week’s reading (see my list of supplemental texts for examples of what you might find). Once you’ve found your resource, paste a link in this shared Google spreadsheet. Be sure to fill in all the information asked for in the sheet.

Participate


Reflect


Note:
*Unless otherwise noted, assignments are due by midnight of the date posted.

 

The Work for Weeks 8 & 9

Unit Theme: Innocence and Experience

Weeks 8-9 Focus: Drama

PrepareParticipateReflect

My Week 8-9 Rundown


Prepare

ReadingOther

(Terms to Know: Plot and setting)

This Week’s Reading

RequiredSupplemental

The following texts will serve as the basis for this week’s discussion:


  • Supplemental
    • Review the items added to the class’s supplemental texts spreadsheet.


Other Preparation Activities

  • Record two entries in your Reading Notebook.
  • Search the internet for an online resource that supplements one of the texts from this week’s reading (see my list of supplemental texts for examples of what you might find). Once you’ve found your resource, paste a link in this shared Google spreadsheet. Be sure to fill in all the information asked for in the sheet.

Participate

  • By Tuesday (10/21): Using #amreading, write a brief “thus-far” summary of the book you’re reading for your book review (i.e., give us the quick lowdown on what’s happening). Be sure to include the book name in the tweet. Also post two comments about this week’s reading/watching. By Sunday (10/26): Reply to three of your peers’ tweets, responding to the quotation or the reading comments. You can find your classmates on Twitter via the list on the flipside of this link.
  • Initial post by noon Thursday (10/23), three peer responses by Sunday (10/26): Participate in the Experiencing Death of a Salesman G+ Discussion.
  • By Sunday (10/26): Complete the Analyzing Death of a Salesman activity.

Reflect


Note:
*Unless otherwise noted, assignments are due by midnight of the date posted.