Introduction to Literature

Reading in the Digital Age

Tag: fiction

The Work for Weeks 11 &12

Unit Theme: Innocence and Experience

Weeks 11-12 Focus: Fiction, Nonfiction, and Poetry

PrepareParticipateReflect


Prepare

ReadingOther

(Terms to Know: point of view and allusion)

This Week’s Reading

RequiredSupplemental

  • Required:
  • Thus far in the semester, I’ve allowed you to choose a portion of the unit reading, but for this section of the course, I’m allowing you to create your own reading list, per the following guidelines:

    • (Fiction): Pick three (3) stories from the fiction section in “Innocence and Experience” (LHE 80-128). This could include Hua’s “Appendix” (LHE 299-304) and Xue’s “Hut on the Mountain” (LHE 304-7).
    • (Nonfiction): Pick two (2) essays from the essays section in “Innocence and Experience” (LHE 280-97).
    • (Poetry): Pick eight (8) poems from the poetry section in “Innocence and Experience” (LHE 129-59). This could include Lim’s “Father from Asia” (LHE 308).
  • Supplemental
    • Review the items added to the class’s supplemental texts spreadsheet.


Other Preparation Activities

  • Record two entries in your Reading Notebook.
  • Search the internet for an online resource that supplements one of the texts from this week’s reading (see my list of supplemental texts for examples of what you might find). Once you’ve found your resource, paste a link in this shared Google spreadsheet. Be sure to fill in all the information asked for in the sheet.

Participate


Reflect


Note:
*Unless otherwise noted, assignments are due by midnight of the date posted.

 

The Work for Week 4

Unit Theme: Conformity and Rebellion

Week 4 Focus: Fiction and Nonfiction

PrepareParticipateReflect

My Week 4 Rundown


Prepare

ReadingOther

(Terms to Know: Irony and satire.)

This Week’s Reading

RequiredSupplemental

Before you begin this week’s reading, review the discussion prompts for this week’s G+ Conversations. The following texts will serve as the basis for this week’s discussion:

  • Required:
    • Introduction to the “Conformity and Rebellion” section, LHE 312-13.
    • (Fiction) “Bartleby the Scrivener” by Herman Melville, LHE 314-40.
    • (Fiction) “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas” by Ursula K. Le Guin, LHE 357-61.
    • (Fiction) Individual choice: Read at least one of the remaining stories in the “Fiction” section of “Culture and Identity” in LHE.
    • (Nonfiction) “A Modest Proposal” by Jonathan Swift, LHE 482-88.
    • (Nonfiction) “Letter from Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King, Jr, LHE 490-502.
    • (Nonfiction) Individual choice. Read at least one of the remaining essays in the “Essays” section of “Conformity and Rebellion” in LHE (this could include the texts in the “Looking Deeper” section).

  • Supplemental

 

Other Preparation Activities

  • Record two entries in your Reading Notebook.
  • Search the internet for an online resource that supplements one of the texts from this week’s reading (see my list of supplemental texts for examples of what you might find). Once you’ve found your resource, paste a link in this shared Google spreadsheet. Be sure to fill in all the information asked for in the sheet.

Participate


Reflect


Note:
*Unless otherwise noted, assignments are due by midnight of the date posted.

 

How Fiction and Nonfiction Function

In at least 200 words, respond to one of the following prompts:

1) While “A Rose for Emily” and “Girl” are both considered short stories, they’re both very different in form. How would you describe the structure of each narrative? As you read both stories, did anything related to their form and/or content seem similar (i.e., plot, tone, character development, dialogue, theme, etc.)? If so, what? How did the unique and similar features of each text influence how you interacted with and responded to the stories? To the characters? To which story did you react most strongly and why?

2) Nonfiction writers often use the techniques of fiction to create compelling representations of lived experience and to reflect on and to critique that experience. Nonfiction, however, is fundamentally different than fiction. As Abcarian and Klotz point out in LHE, one major distinction between the genres is that fiction is composed of imaginary worlds inhabited by imaginary characters while nonfiction “generally speaks with the voice of a real person about the real world” (LHE 30–31). So to recap: in this admittedly oversimplified comparison, fiction is imaginary while nonfiction is real.

How does an understanding of this fundamental difference influence the ways you approach nonfiction and what you get out of it? Alternately, how does a nonfiction writer’s use or non-use of the techniques of fiction influence the ways you read, interact with, and receive nonfiction narratives? Use at least one of the essays from this week’s reading—Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant,” Hoque’s “Ironed Blue Sky, 88° F,” or the one you read for individual choice—to illustrate your answers.

Post your initial response to the Fiction/Non-fiction page on our G+ community then reply directly to your peers’ G+ posts.